Celebrating Women’s History in Arizona: The Suffrage Movement

Celebrating Women’s History in Arizona: The Suffrage Movement

At the end of the nineteenth century, women in Arizona began their fight for suffrage: the right to vote. On November 5, 1912, Arizona’s men voted in favor of equal suffrage, opening the door for women to vote in state elections and hold public office in Arizona. Suffrage for women across the United States, including the ability to vote in federal elections, did not occur until the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920.

Frances Willard Munds, Pauline O’Neill, and Laura Gregg Cannon were among the many Arizona women who banded together in their tireless efforts to secure the right to vote. Frances Willard Munds’ active involvement in the Arizona Women’s Christian Temperance Union and the Arizona Equal Suffrage Association made her a driving force in the suffrage campaign. Pauline O’Neill made strides by leading the Arizona Suffrage Association before serving in the Arizona Legislature for two terms. Laura Gregg Cannon came to Arizona as a representative of the National American Women’s Suffrage Association, providing invaluable advice to the Equal Suffrage Association of Arizona.

Explore more about these women, and their contemporaries, who helped pave the way for women’s suffrage and their right to hold public office in Arizona, with the resources found at DAZL, the Digital Arizona Library Collection.        

Handbill Votes for Women 1910

Handbill advocating votes for women

 

Arizona Digital Newspaper Project

“Women Suffrage Surprises,” The Bisbee Daily Review, November 7, 1912, p. 1, column 3.

“Arizona Women to Arizona Men,” The Holbrook News, November 1, 1912, p. 1, column 2.

“Judge A.C. Baker Declares in Favor Women Suffrage,” The Copper Era and Morenci Leader, October 18, 1912, p. 8, column 2.

“Votes for Women,” Mohave County Miner, October 5, 1912, p. 1, column 3.

“Five States for Equal Suffrage,” Mohave County Miner, November 9, 1912, p. 2, column 3.

“The Launching of Campaign for Suffrage,” Arizona Republican, September 15, 1912, p. 1, column 1.

“Equal Rights and Statehood,” The Oasis, March 12, 1910, p. 6, column 1.

 

Arizona Memory Project

“Do Arizona Women Want the Ballot,” Arizona the New State Magazine: Women’s Number, Vol. 2, No. 5, February 1912, p. 9, Arizona Historical Books and Periodicals Collection, Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

“Legal Rights of Women in Arizona,” Arizona the New State Magazine: Women’s Number, Vol. 2, No. 5, February 1912, p. 14, Arizona Historical Books and Periodicals Collection, Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

“Women’s Suffrage Petition,” 1912, Arizona State Archives – State, County and Local Government Records, Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

“Telegram from women of Gila County to Governor Hunt in support of women suffrage,” February 27, 1899, Arizona State Archives Manuscript Collection, Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

“Telegram from Citizens of Gila County to Governor Hunt in opposition to women suffrage,” February 19, 1899, Arizona State Archives Manuscript Collection, Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

“Handbill Votes for Women,” 1912, Arizona State Archives – State, County and Local Government Records, Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

“Speech by Frances Willard Munds written between 1911 and 1912,” 1911, Arizona State Archives – State, County and Local Government Records, Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame Collection, 1985 – 2011, Carnegie Center.

“Photograph/portrait of Pauline O’Neill, a member of the Arizona State Legislature and wife of Spanish – American war hero Bucky O’Neill, taken in Prescott (Ariz.),” 1890, Arizona Archives Historical Photographs, Arizona State Library, Archives, and Public Records, History and Archives Division.

 

Reading Arizona

Mary Logan Rothschild, Doing What the Day Brought: An Oral History of Arizona Women, University of Arizona Press, 1991.